ⓘ Japanese kitchen knives ..

Deba bōchō

Deba bōchō are Japanese style kitchen knives primarily used to cut fish, though also used when cutting meat. They come in different sizes, sometimes up to 30 cm in length. The deba bōchō first appeared during the Edo period in Sakai. It is designed to behead and fillet fish. Its thickness, and often a more obtuse angle on the back of the heel allow it to cut off the heads of fish without damage. The rest of the blade is then used to ride against the fish bones, separating the fillet. Traditionally, these are made of carbon steel, which needs regular maintenance and oiling to prevent rust. ...

Nakiri bōchō

Nakiri bōchō and usuba bōchō are Japanese-style vegetable knives. They differ from the deba bōchō in their shape, as they have a straight blade edge suitable for cutting all the way to the cutting board without the need for a horizontal pull or push. These knives are also much thinner. While the deba bōchō is a heavy blade for easy cutting through thin bones, the blade is not suitable for chopping vegetables, as the thicker blade can break the vegetable slice. The nakiri bōchō and the usuba bōchō have a much thinner blade. This does not help with cutting small bones in fish or meat, but is ...

Sashimi bōchō

Sashimi bōchō, literally "sashimi knife" is a type of long, thin knife used in Japanese cuisine to prepare sashimi. Types of sashimi bōchō include tako hiki, yanagi ba, and fugu hiki. Similar to the nakiri bōchō, the style differs slightly between Tokyo and Osaka. In Osaka, the Yanagi BA has a pointed end, whereas in Tokyo tacos Hickey has a rectangular end. Taco Hickey are usually used to prepare octopus. Puffer Hickey is similar to the Yanagi BA, except that the blade is thinner and more flexible. As the name implies, puffer Hickey is traditionally used to slice very thin fugu sashimi an ...

Unagisaki hōchō

An unagisaki hōchō is a knife specialized for filleting eel. The sharp tip of the knife is pushed into the eel near the head, and then slid along the body of the eel to open up the entire length of the fish. Besides the standard version as shown in the picture, there are many other local styles that differ significantly for different cities in Japan like Nagoya, Osaka, and Kyoto.

Usuba bōchō

Usuba bōchō is the traditional vegetable knife for the professional Japanese chef. Like other Japanese professional knives, usuba are chisel ground, and have a bevel on the front side, and have a hollow ground urasuki on the back side. Usuba characteristically have a flat edge, with little or no curve, and are tall, to allow knuckle clearance when chopping on a cutting board. Usuba literally means "thin blade" indicating its relative thinness compared to other knives, required for cutting through firm vegetables without cracking them. Due to its height and straight edge, usuba are also use ...

Yanagi ba

Yanagi-ba-bōchō, Yanagi-ba, or to Yanagi, is a long and thin knife used in the Japanese cuisine. It is the typical example of the sashimi bōchō that are used to prepare sashimi and nigiri sushi. In the preparation of sashimi and nigiri sushi, the purpose is usually the cut surface is smooth, shiny, and even in order to maximize the taste. The construction of the Yanagiba designed for this purpose. Single ground: For right-hand use, the yanagiba has a bevel on the right side and a concave on the left. This allows a more acute angle compared to most double bevel knives and nonstick propertie ...