ⓘ Principles ..

List of eponymous laws

This list of eponymous laws provides links to articles on laws, principles, adages, and other succinct observations or predictions named after a person. In some cases the person named has coined the law – such as Parkinsons law. In others, the work or publications of the individual have led to the law being so named – as is the case with Moores law. There are also laws ascribed to individuals by others, such as Murphys law; or given eponymous names despite the absence of the named person.

Anna Karenina principle

The Anna Karenina principle states that a deficiency in any one of a number of factors dooms an endeavor to failure. Consequently, a successful endeavor is one where every possible deficiency has been avoided. The name of the principle derives from Leo Tolstoys book Anna Karenina, which begins: All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. In other words: happy families share a common set of attributes which lead to happiness, while any of a variety of attributes can cause an unhappy family. This concept has been generalized to apply to several fields of stud ...

Anthropic principle

The anthropic principle is a philosophical consideration that any data we collect about the universe is filtered by the fact that, in order for it to be observable in the first place, it must be compatible with the conscious and sapient life that observes it. Proponents of the anthropic principle reason that it explains why this universe has the age and the fundamental physical constants necessary to accommodate conscious life. As a result, outside the narrow range thought to be compatible with life it would seem impossible that life could develop. The strong anthropic principle, as explai ...

Basic limiting principle

A Basic Limiting Principle is a general principle that limits our explanations metaphysically or epistemologically, and which normally goes unquestioned or even unnoticed in our everyday or scientific thinking. The term was introduced by the philosopher C. D. Broad in his 1949 paper "The Relevance of Psychical research to Philosophy": "There are certain limiting principles which we unhesitatingly take for granted as the framework within which all our practical activities and our scientific theories are confined. Some of these seem to be self-evident. Others are so overwhelmingly supported ...

Bateman's principle

Batemans principle, in evolutionary biology, is that in most species, variability in reproductive success is greater in males than in females. It was first proposed by Angus John Bateman, an English geneticist. Bateman suggested that, since males are capable of producing millions of sperm cells with little effort, while females invest much higher levels of energy in order to nurture a relatively small number of eggs, the female plays a significantly larger role in their offsprings reproductive success. Bateman’s paradigm thus views females as the limiting factor of parental investment, ove ...

Canon (basic principle)

The concept of canon is very broad; in a general sense it refers to being one or a group of official, authentic or approved rules or laws, particularly ecclesiastical; or group of official, authentic, or approved literary or artistic works, such as the literature of a particular author, of a particular genre, or a particular group of religious scriptural texts, or similarly, one or a body of rules, principles, or standards accepted as axiomatic and universally binding in a religion, or a field of study or art. This can be related to such topics as literary canons, a topic within itself, fo ...