ⓘ Causal fallacies ..

Questionable cause

The questionable cause - also known as causal fallacy, false cause, or non causa pro causa - is a category of informal fallacies in which a cause is incorrectly identified. For example: "Every time I go to sleep, the sun goes down. Therefore, my going to sleep causes the sun to set." The two events may coincide, but have no causal connection. Fallacies of questionable cause include: Circular cause and consequence Third-cause fallacy Wrong direction Correlation implies causation cum hoc, ergo propter hoc Post hoc ergo propter hoc Jumping to conclusions Fallacy of the single cause Regression ...

Animistic fallacy

The animistic fallacy is the informal fallacy of arguing that an event or situation necessarily arose because someone intentionally acted to cause it. While it could be that someone set out to effect a specific goal, the fallacy appears in an argument that states this must be the case. The name of the fallacy comes from the animistic belief that changes in the physical world are the work of conscious spirits.

Appeal to consequences

Appeal to consequences, also known as argumentum ad consequentiam, is an argument that concludes a hypothesis to be either true or false based on whether the premise leads to desirable or undesirable consequences. This is based on an appeal to emotion and is a type of informal fallacy, since the desirability of a premises consequence does not make the premise true. Moreover, in categorizing consequences as either desirable or undesirable, such arguments inherently contain subjective points of view. In logic, appeal to consequences refers only to arguments that assert a conclusions truth va ...

Argumentum ad baculum

Argumentum ad baculum is the fallacy committed when one appeals to force or the threat of force to bring about the acceptance of a conclusion. One participates in argumentum ad baculum when one points out the negative consequences of holding the contrary position. It is a specific case of the negative form of an argument to the consequences.

Availability heuristic

The availability heuristic, also known as availability bias, is a mental shortcut that relies on immediate examples that come to a given persons mind when evaluating a specific topic, concept, method or decision. The availability heuristic operates on the notion that if something can be recalled, it must be important, or at least more important than alternative solutions which are not as readily recalled. Subsequently, under the availability heuristic, people tend to heavily weigh their judgments toward more recent information, making new opinions biased toward that latest news. The availa ...

Fallacy of the single cause

The fallacy of the single cause, also known as complex cause, causal oversimplification, causal reductionism, and reduction fallacy, is a fallacy of questionable cause that occurs when it is assumed that there is a single, simple cause of an outcome when in reality it may have been caused by a number of only jointly sufficient causes. It can be logically reduced to: X caused Y; therefore, X was the only cause of Y" although A,B,C.etc. also contributed to Y. Causal oversimplification is a specific kind of false dilemma where conjoint possibilities are ignored. In other words, the possible c ...

                                     

ⓘ Causal fallacies

  • The fallacy of the single cause, also known as complex cause, causal oversimplification, causal reductionism, and reduction fallacy is a fallacy of questionable
  • cause - also known as causal fallacy false cause, or non causa pro causa non - cause for cause in Latin - is a category of informal fallacies in which a cause
  • believe that their action was the cause of the change when in fact it was not causal This use of the word regression was coined by Sir Francis Galton in a
  • hoc ergo propter hoc Correlative - based fallacies Post hoc ergo propter hoc Bennett, Bo, Texas sharpshooter fallacy Logically Fallacious, retrieved 21
  • the character of the fallacy it represents a misunderstanding of the nature of the causal relations between events. Every causal claim requires a separate
  • gambler s fallacy named by philosopher Ian Hacking, is a formal fallacy of Bayesian inference which is an inverse of the better known gambler s fallacy It
  • fallacies Because of their variety of structure and application, fallacies are challenging to classify so as to satisfy all practitioners. Fallacies
  • gambler s fallacy they are more likely to exhibit the hot - hand fallacy as well, suggesting that one construct is responsible for the two fallacies The difference
  • variation on the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy and a member of the questionable cause group of fallacies All of these examples deal with a lurking
  • relationship in which two or more events or variables are associated but not causally related, due to either coincidence or the presence of a certain third
  • The animistic fallacy is the informal fallacy of arguing that an event or situation necessarily arose because someone intentionally acted to cause it