ⓘ Parasites of animals ..

Behavior-altering parasite

Behavior-altering parasites are parasites with two or more hosts, capable of causing changes in the behavior of one of their hosts to enhance their transmission, sometimes directly affecting the hosts decision-making and behavior control mechanisms. They do this by making the intermediate host, where they may reproduce asexually, more likely to be eaten by a predator at a higher trophic level which becomes the definitive host where the parasite reproduces sexually; the mechanism is therefore sometimes called parasite increased trophic facilitation or parasite increased trophic transmission ...

Intestinal parasite infection

An intestinal parasite infection is a condition in which a parasite infects the gastro-intestinal tract of humans and other animals. Such parasites can live anywhere in the body, but most prefer the intestinal wall. Routes of exposure and infection include ingestion of undercooked meat, drinking infected water, fecal-oral transmission and skin absorption. Some types of helminths and protozoa are classified as intestinal parasites that cause infection - those that reside in the intestines. These infections can damage or sicken the host humans or other animals. If the intestinal parasite inf ...

Parasitic flies of domestic animals

Many species of flies of the two-winged type, Order Diptera, such as mosquitoes, horse-flies, blow-flies and warble-flies, cause direct parasitic disease to domestic animals, and transmit organisms that cause diseases. These infestations and infections cause distress to companion animals, and in livestock industry the financial costs of these diseases are high. These problems occur wherever domestic animals are reared. This article provides an overview of parasitic flies from a veterinary perspective, with emphasis on the disease-causing relationships between these flies and their host ani ...

Quahog parasite unknown

The quahog parasite unknown, or QPX, is a single-celled protist parasite in the class Labyrinthulomycota. It affects hard clams, or quahogs, both cultured and wild. Parasites similar to QPX were first observed in New Brunswick, Canada, in 1959, when a mass death of hard clams was observed. Outbreaks have also occurred in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Virginia, always only in quahog clams. Symptoms of QPX include chipping of the shells, mantle swelling, stunted shell growth and the development of nodules.