ⓘ Computer files ..

End-of-file

In computing, end-of-file is a condition in a computer operating system where no more data can be read from a data source. The data source is usually called a file or stream. In the C Standard Library, the character reading functions such as getchar return a value equal to the symbolic value macro EOF to indicate that an end-of-file condition has occurred. The actual value EOF is implementation-dependent but is commonly -1, such as in glibc and is distinct from all valid character codes. Block-reading functions return the number of bytes read, and if this is fewer than asked for, then the ...

File sequence

In computing, as well as in non-computing contexts, a file sequence is a well-ordered, collection of files, usually related to each other in some way. In computing, file sequences should ideally obey some kind of locality of reference principle, so that not only all the files belonging to the same sequence ought to be locally referenced to each other, but they also obey that as much as is their proximity with respect to the ordering relation. Explicit file sequences are, in fact, sequences whose filenames all end with a numeric or alphanumeric tag in the end excluding file extension. The a ...

File signature

In computing, a file signature is data used to identify or verify the contents of a file. In particular, it may refer to: File magic number: bytes within a file used to identify the format of the file; generally a short sequence of bytes most are 2-4 bytes long placed at the beginning of the file; see list of file signatures File checksum or more generally the result of a hash function over the file contents: data used to verify the integrity of the file contents, generally against transmission errors or malicious attacks. The signature can be included at the end of the file or in a separa ...

File size

File size is a measure of how much data a computer file contains or, alternately, how much storage it consumes. Typically, file size is expressed in units of measurement based on the byte. By convention, file size units use either a metric prefix or a binary prefix. When a file is written to a file system, which is the case in most modern devices, it may consume slightly more disk space than the file requires. This is because the file system rounds the size up to include any unused space left over in the last disk sector used by the file. A sector is the smallest amount of space addressabl ...

Filename mangling

The process of filename mangling, in computing, involves a translation of the file name for compatibility at the operating system level. It occurs when a filename on a filesystem appears in a form incompatible with the operating system accessing it. Such mangling occurs, for example, on computer networks when a Windows machine attempts to access a file on a Unix server and that file has a filename which includes characters not valid in Windows.

Filespec

In MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows, filespec is a term meaning a filename identifier that specifies both the name and location of a single file. The filespec differs from the filename in that the filespec includes a complete specification, within a particular file system, of the files location. Thus, win.com is a filename and C:\Windows\win.com is a filespec.