ⓘ Sociology of knowledge ..

Sociology of knowledge

The sociology of knowledge is the study of the relationship between human thought and the social context within which it arises, and of the effects that prevailing ideas have on societies. It is not a specialized area of sociology but instead deals with broad fundamental questions about the extent and limits of social influences on individuals lives and with the social-cultural basis of our knowledge about the world. Complementary to the sociology of knowledge is the sociology of ignorance, including the study of nescience, ignorance, knowledge gaps, or non-knowledge as inherent features o ...

Activist knowledge

Activist knowledge or dissident knowledge, refers to the ideological and ideational aspects of social movements such as challenging or reformulating dominant political ideas and ideologies, and developing new concepts, thoughts and meanings through the interactions with social, political, cultural and economic authorities. The cognitive or ideational aspects of social movements have been theorized by a group of scholars such as Ron Eyerman and Andrew Jamison from a cognitive approach, Hank Johnston and David Snow and others from a framing perspective and S A Hosseini, from an integrative a ...

Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge

Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge is a fictitious taxonomy of animals described by the writer Jorge Luis Borges in his 1942 essay "The Analytical Language of John Wilkins". Wilkins, a 17th-century philosopher, had proposed a universal language based on a classification system that would encode a description of the thing a word describes into the word itself - for example, Zi identifies the genus beasts ; Zit denotes the "difference" rapacious beasts of the dog kind ; and finally Zitα specifies dog. In response to this proposal and in order to illustrate the arbitrariness and cultu ...

Collective memory

Collective memory refers to the shared pool of memories, knowledge and information of a social group that is significantly associated with the groups identity. The English phrase "collective memory" and the equivalent French phrase la memoire collective appeared in the second half of the nineteenth century. The philosopher and sociologist Maurice Halbwachs analyzed and advanced the concept of the collective memory in the book "Les cadres sociaux de la memoire". Collective memory can be constructed, shared, and passed on by large and small social groups. Examples of these groups can include ...

Collective representations

Collective representations are concepts, ideas, categories and beliefs that do not belong to isolated individuals, but are instead the product of a social collectivity. Durkheim originated the term collective representations to emphasise the way that many of the categories of everyday use–space, time, class, number etc–were in fact the product of collective human evolution:" Collective representations are the result of an immense co-operation, which stretches not only into space but into time as well”. Collective representations are generally slow-changing and backed by social authority, a ...

Folksonomy

Folksonomy is a classification system in which end users apply public tags to online items, typically to make those items easier for themselves or others to find later. Over time, this can give rise to a classification system based on those tags and how often they are applied or searched for, in contrast to a taxonomic classification designed by the owners of the content and specified when it is published. This practice is also known as collaborative tagging, social classification, social indexing, and social tagging. Folksonomy was originally "the result of personal free tagging of inform ...