ⓘ Hog-Morse was the tendency of inexperienced telegraph operators to make errors when sending or receiving in Morse code. It is so called after one example, home ..

                                     

ⓘ Hog-Morse

Hog-Morse was the tendency of inexperienced telegraph operators to make errors when sending or receiving in Morse code. It is so called after one example, "home" becoming "hog", which is just a subtle error in timing. The term was current in the United States in the period when American Morse code was in use.

The American code was a little different to the International Morse Code currently in use. With the American code it is easier to make timing errors of this sort because there were several more symbol timings than there are in the international code. For instance, the international code has only two symbols, dots and dashes, but the American code has several lengths of dash. There is a distinction between "L" ▄▄ ▄▄▄▄ ▄ and "T" ▄▄ ▄▄ ▄. Also, in the international code the space between symbols within a character is always the same, but American Morse has two different spaces. The letters "S" ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄, "C" ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄, and "R" ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ all consist of three dots, but the timing is different in each case.

A frequently quoted, but possibly apocryphal, story from the historical period concerns the similarity of "L" and "T" in the American code. A company in Richmond, Virginia received a request for quotation for a load of "undressed staves" rough sawn wood intended for the manufacture of barrels, but the telegraph operator had sent ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄▄▄▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ SLAVES instead of ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ STAVES thus attempting to order "undressed slaves". The company replied reminding the customer that slavery had been abolished.

Another example given in the literature is "please fill me in" becoming "6naz fimme q". One commentator has called this the 19th century autocorrect.

                                     
  • known as hog - Morse Over time, with the disappearance of landline telegraphy and the end of commercial radio use of Morse Code, American Morse has become
  • Operators Club Guglielmo Marconi High - speed telegraphy Hog morse Instructograph Morse code abbreviations Morse code mnemonics NATO phonetic alphabet Tap code
  • west - southwest of Madison. Morse grew up on this farm, where the family raised Devon cattle for beef, Percheron and Hackney horses, dairy cows, hogs sheep, poultry
  • apt to send garbled messages, an effect known as hog Morse The second reason is that American Morse is more prone to intersymbol interference ISI because
  • The song is featured in the films Blow 2001 Joe Dirt 2001 and Wild Hogs 2007 at the end of the fourth episode of the HBO television drama series
  • and Deadly Lies 1980 William L. DeAndrea, The Hog Murders 1981 Bill Granger, Public Murders 1982 L. A. Morse The Old Dick 1983 Teri White, Triangle 1984
  • Mitchel in 1800 at North Haven, on a peninsula just north of Sag Harbor called Hog Neck in the eighteenth century. Relocated here in 1813, it was added to the
  • Surrey approximately 6 km west of Guildford on the northern slopes of the Hog s Back. Wanborough lies between Puttenham and Normandy which includes the
  • Einstein Chairman Harold C. Urey Vice - Chairman Hans Bethe Thorfin R. Hogness Philip M. Morse Linus Pauling Leo Szilard Victor Weisskopf Half the members had