ⓘ Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography. The Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography was founded by the American geographer Carl O. Sauer. Sauer w ..

                                     

ⓘ Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography

The Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography was founded by the American geographer Carl O. Sauer. Sauer was a professor of geography at the University of California at Berkeley from 1923 until becoming professor emeritus in 1957 and was instrumental in the early development of the geography graduate program at Berkeley and the discipline of geography in the United States. Each generation of this research school has pursued new theoretical and methodological approaches, but their study of the peoples and places of Latin America and the Caribbean has remained the common denominator since the early 20th century. Carl O. Sauer himself did not develop a particular interest in Latin America before 1925, when Oskar Schmieder, a German geographer, disciple of Alfred Hettner, and expert in Latin American regional geography, arrived at Berkeley, coming from Cordoba, Argentina, to work as an associate professor. Obviously, his interest awoke during Schmieders presence between 1925 and 1930. After Schmieders departure in 1930, Carl O. Sauer began to offer seminars on the regional geography of Latin America.

                                     

1. First Generation

Sauer graduated many doctoral students, the majority completing dissertations on Latin American and Caribbean topics and thereby founding the Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography. Sauers Ph.D. students who completed dissertations on Latin American and Caribbean topics are Fred Kniffen 1930, Peveril Meigs 1932, Donald Brand 1933, Henry Bruman 1940, Felix W. McBryde 1940, Robert Bowman 1941, Dan Stanislawski 1944, Robert C. West 1946, James J. Parsons 1948, Edwin Doran 1953, Philip Wagner 1953, Brigham Arnold 1954, Homer Aschmann 1954, B. LeRoy Gordon 1954, Gordon Merrill 1957, Donald Innis 1958, Carl Johannessen 1959, Clinton Edwards 1962, and Leonard Sawatzky 1967.

                                     

2. Second Generation

Of Sauers doctoral students, James J. Parsons became the most prolific in terms of directing Latin Americanist doctoral dissertations. He remained at the University of California at Berkeley and produced many of the Ph.D.s in the second generation of the Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography: Campbell Pennington 1959, William Denevan 1963, David Harris 1963, Thomas Veblen 1975, and Karl Zimmerer 1987.

                                     

3. Third Generation

One of the second generation, William Denevan, became a professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and, in turn, produced the majority of the third generation. Denevans Ph.D. students who completed dissertations on Latin American topics are, among others, Daniel W. Gade 1967; co-chaired, Bernard Nietschmann 1970, Roger Byrne 1972, Roland Bergmann 1974, Billie Lee Turner II 1974, Stuart White 1981, Hildegardo Cordova 1982, Gregory Knapp 1984, Kent Mathewson 1987, John M. Treacy 1989, and Oliver Coomes 1992.

                                     

4. Subsequent Generations

A member of the fourth generation, William E. Doolittle studied with Billie Lee Turner II, a prominent member of the third generation. Turner has graduated almost 50 PhD students, many working in the Americas like Anthony Bebbington, who has over 25 fifth generation graduated students Doolittle earned a Ph.D. in 1979, became a professor in the Department of Geography and the Environment at University of Texas at Austin, and is one person to extend the school into the fifth generation. Doolittles Ph.D. students who completed dissertations on Latin American topics are Dean P. Lambert 1992, Andrew Sluyter 1995, Emily H. Young 1995, Eric P. Perramond 1999, Phil L. Crossley 1999, Jerry O. Joby Bass 2003, Maria G. Fadiman 2003, and Matthew Fry 2008.

Several of the fifth generation hold faculty positions in university departments with doctoral programs, and a sixth generation is now emerging. They are applying new approaches and research questions to the study of the peoples and places of Latin America and the Caribbean.



                                     
  • professor emeritus of Geography at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and a prominent member of the Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography He also worked
  • generation of the Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography He is currently the Erich W. Zimmermann Regents Professor in Geography at the Department of Geography
  • was a professor of Geography at the University of Vermont and a prominent member of the Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography His main interests
  • Caribbean topics and thereby founding the Berkeley School of Latin Americanist Geography The first generation consisted of Sauer s own students: Fred B. Kniffen
  • States. Latin Americanists consider a variety of perspectives and employ diverse research tools in their work. The interdisciplinary disciplines of study
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  • and contributed the Latin Americanist focus - and probably German geographic methodology - to the development of the Berkeley School Together, they carried
  • Rafael Correa of Ecuador are all part of this wave of left - wing politicians who also often declare themselves socialists, Latin Americanists or anti - imperialists