ⓘ Corked bat. In baseball, a corked bat is a specially modified baseball bat that has been filled with cork or other lighter, less dense substances to make the ba ..

                                     

ⓘ Corked bat

In baseball, a corked bat is a specially modified baseball bat that has been filled with cork or other lighter, less dense substances to make the bat lighter. A lighter bat gives a hitter a quicker swing and may improve the hitters timing. Despite popular belief that corking a bat creates a "trampoline effect" causing a batted ball to travel farther, physics researchers have shown that this is not the case. In Major League Baseball, modifying a bat with foreign substances and using it in play is illegal and subject to ejection and further punishment.

                                     

1. Construction of corked bats

To cork a bat, a hole approximately 1/2-inch 12.5 mm in diameter is drilled down through the thick end of the bat roughly six inches deep. Crushed cork, bouncy ball, sawdust, or other similar material is compacted into the hole and the end is typically patched up with glue and sawdust. However, this weakens the bats structural integrity and makes it more susceptible to breakage, even more so if the cork is placed beyond roughly six inches into the bat. Corked bats are typically discovered when they break during play.

Corked bats were tested in the 2007 season of MythBusters where it was found that the cork was detrimental to the bats performance.

                                     

2. Corked bats in Major League Baseball

Using a corked bat in Major League Baseball is in violation of Rule 6.03 a5, which states

A batter is out for illegal action when:

5 He uses or attempts to use a bat that, in the umpire’s judgment, has been altered or tampered with in such a way to improve the distance factor or cause an unusual reaction on the baseball. This includes bats that are filled, flat-surfaced, nailed, hollowed, grooved or covered with a substance such as paraffin, wax, etc.

It has been a popular belief that the material used to cork a bat creates a "trampoline effect," causing a ball hit with a corked bat to travel farther than one hit with an uncorked bat. Research has shown this not to be the case. Another perceived advantage of using a corked bat is its effect on the bats weight. Corking a bat causes the bat to be lighter, which in turn allows the batter to swing it more quickly. However, the reduction in weight negatively affects the velocity of the ball as it leaves the bat, effectively cancelling out the advantage gained from a quicker bat speed. A lighter bat can, however, create an advantage by allowing the batter to delay a swing for a fraction of a second, which would allow for more accuracy.

                                     

2.1. Corked bats in Major League Baseball History of use in Major League Baseball

Since 1970, six players have been caught using corked bats. The following table summarizes these events:

In addition, former player and Major League manager Phil Garner admitted in January 2010 on a Houston radio station that he used a corked bat against Gaylord Perry and "hit a home run" with it. Garner also admitted that the 2005 Houston Astros used corked bats during the 2005 World Series.

In 2010, Deadspin reported that Pete Rose used corked bats during his 1985 pursuit of Ty Cobbs all-time hits record. Two sports memorabilia collectors who owned Roses game-used bats from that season had the bats x-rayed and found the telltale signs of corking. Rose had previously denied using corked bats.

                                     
  • The 1994 Cleveland Indians corked bat incident took place on July 15, 1994, at Comiskey Park in Chicago during a game between the Cleveland Indians and
  • working in the International League in 2001, Vanvleet discovered the corked bat of Jose Guillen while the major leaguer was playing in a rehabilitation
  • 2012 - 05 - 07. Mythbusters, season 5 Corked Bat National Collegiate Athletic Association Standard for Testing Baseball Bat Performance PDF acs.psu.edu
  • Brett Pine Tar game in 1983. He was the plate umpire for the Sammy Sosa corked bat game on June 3, 2003, when the Chicago Cubs hosted the Tampa Bay Devil
  • leagues. He got his first call up when Sammy Sosa was suspended for the corked bat incident. Then again when Sosa had a back spasm because of a sneeze. Kelton
  • play in alumni games. In the early 1990s Otis admitted that he used a corked bat during part of his Major League career. List of Major League Baseball
  • Albert Belle s bat was confiscated by umpire Dave Phillips. It was the result of White Sox manager Gene Lamont believing that the bat was corked During the
  • retrieve his corked bat and substitute it with another teammate s bat resulting in a seven - game suspension. The revelation of Belle s use of corked bats was
  • September 25, 2019. 1992 Upper Deck baseball card. 585 Sammy Sosa s corked bat up for auction ESPN.com. Retrieved 8 February 2019. Baseball portal
  • 18 - inch - wide 460 mm cinder block. He replaced the corked bat with a conventional bat but the bat had Paul Sorrento s name on it. Belle was suspended
  • the MVP voting. In addition, Cash later admitted to using an illegal corked bat during the 1961 season, demonstrating how he had drilled a hole in his