ⓘ Coriaria thymifolia, known as shanshi, tutu-papa, tutu-heu-heu, toot plant, or ink plant is a shrub found in montane environments throughout the Americas and Pa ..

                                     

ⓘ Coriaria thymifolia

Coriaria thymifolia, known as shanshi, tutu-papa, tutu-heu-heu, toot plant, or ink plant is a shrub found in montane environments throughout the Americas and Pacific Islands. The plant bears dark blue, almost black, blossom-shaped clustered berries that resemble black liquorice. The fruit is widely known as toxic to livestock, with many sheep, cattle, goats, and in one recorded case even a captive elephant dying from "toot poisoning" in New Zealand, and cases of animal deaths also recorded in South America. In humans the plant reportedly has hallucinogenic, possibly deliriant, properties when consumed, and is sought out for these purposes by Ecuadorian peasants. Reported effects include a sensation of flight. The cause of the toxic and hallucinogenic effects is not known, but is suspected to be an unidentified glycoside. Despite this usage, and the plants toxicity, human fatalities from C. thymifolia poisoning are considered rare, although it can easily cause violent convulsions. The dark-coloured fruit are also used in South America to make a traditional ink called chanchi. Animals poisoned by C. thymifolia have been successfully treated using ammonium carbonate, with lime and other alkalies used in humans.

                                     
  • Coriaria is the sole genus in the family Coriariaceae, which was described by Linnaeus in 1753. It includes 14 species of small trees, shrubs and subshrubs
  • New Zealand. The larvae feed on Coriaria species, including Coriaria thymifolia Coriaria angustissima and Coriaria ruscifolia. They mine the leaves