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You Came Along

You Came Along is a 1945 romantic comedy-drama film set in World War II, directed by John Farrow. The original Robert Smith screenplay was rewritten by Ayn Rand. You Came Along stars Robert Cummings and in her film debut, Lizabeth Scott. The plot ...

Young Widow

Young Widow is a 1946 drama film directed by Edwin L. Marin and starring Jane Russell and Louis Hayward. It focuses on Joan Kenwood, a young journalist who cannot get over her husbands death in World War II. Kenwood is reminded in large ways and ...

Youth Runs Wild

Youth Runs Wild is a 1944 B movie directed by Mark Robson and starring Bonita Granville, Kent Smith, Jean Brooks, Glen Vernon and Vanessa Brown. The plot concerns unattentive parents and juvenile delinquency. The film was produced by Val Lewton. ...

Fichte-Bunker

The Fichte-Bunker is a nineteenth-century gasometer in the Kreuzberg district of Berlin, Germany that was made into an air-raid shelter in World War II and subsequently was used as a shelter for the homeless and for refugees, in particular for th ...

Middlesbrough during World War II

Middlesbrough was the first major British town and industrial target to be bombed during the Second World War. The Luftwaffe first attacked the town on 25 May 1940 when a lone bomber dropped 13 bombs between South Bank Road and the South Steel Pl ...

Admiralty scaffolding

Admiralty scaffolding, also known as Obstacle Z.1 or sometimes simply given as beach scaffolding or anti-tank scaffolding, was a British design of anti-tank and anti-boat obstacle made of tubular steel. It was widely deployed on beaches of southe ...

Air Raid Precautions in the United Kingdom

Air Raid Precautions refers to a number of organisations and guidelines in the United Kingdom dedicated to the protection of civilians from the danger of air raids. Government consideration for air raid precautions increased in the 1920s and 30s, ...

The American Committee for the Defense of British Homes

The American Committee for the Defense of British Homes was an American organization during World War II that donated weapons to British citizens for defense from a possible German invasion after the 1937 Firearms Act. C. Suydam Cutting was its m ...

Blackout (wartime)

A blackout during war, or in preparation for an expected war, is the practice of collectively minimizing outdoor light, including upwardly directed light. This was done in the 20th century to prevent crews of enemy aircraft from being able to ide ...

British hardened field defences of World War II

British hardened field defences of World War II were small fortified structures constructed as a part of British anti-invasion preparations. They were popularly known as pillboxes, a reference to their shape.

British propaganda during World War II

Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audi ...

Camouflages for sabotage equipment used by the German sabotage services in World War II

"Camouflages for sabotage equipment used by the German sabotage services" is the name of a declassified MI5 file which itemizes Nazi deception techniques employed in World War II. The file was made known to the public in 2003. During the War, Ger ...

Charles H. Roe

Charles H Roe was a Yorkshire coachbuilding company. It was for most of its life based at Crossgates Carriage Works, in Leeds. In 1947 it was taken over by Park Royal Vehicles. Two years later, along with its parent, it became part of Associated ...

Clifford Road Air Raid Shelter

The Clifford Road Air Raid Shelter, located under the playground of Clifford Road Primary School in Ipswich was built during the first months of World War II. It was an unusually solid construction, capable of holding several hundred people. Afte ...

Douglas House, London

The Douglas House, London was a US servicemens club operated by the United States Air Force for twenty-five years at two different locations in Londons West End. The clubs purpose was to provide "home-style service" for the thousands of American ...

Fellowship of the Bellows

The Fellowships of the Bellows were loosely organised international groups formed during World War II to collect funds for the purchase of aircraft for the Royal Air Force. Lord Beaverbrook, owner of the Daily Express and Minister of Aircraft Pro ...

Home intelligence

Home Intelligence was a division of the Ministry of Information which was a government social research organisation responsible for monitoring civilian morale in Britain during the Second World War.

Italian Chapel

The Italian Chapel is a highly ornate Catholic chapel on Lamb Holm in the Orkney Islands. It was built during World War II by Italian prisoners of war, who were housed on the previously uninhabited island while they constructed the Churchill Barr ...

Macon (food)

Macon is a cured and smoked form of mutton. Macon is prepared in a similar manner to bacon, with the meat being either dry cured with large quantities of salt or wet cured with brine and then smoked. The name macon is a portmanteau word of m utto ...

Merchant Navy (United Kingdom)

The Merchant Navy is the maritime register of the United Kingdom, and comprises the seagoing commercial interests of UK-registered ships and their crews. Merchant Navy vessels fly the Red Ensign and are regulated by the Maritime and Coastguard Ag ...

National Camps Corporation

The National Camps Corporation was a British government-funded non-profit organisation established under the Camps Act 1939. The role of the corporation was to construct and administer camps in the countryside that could be used for educational e ...

National Fire Service

The National Fire Service was the single fire service created in Great Britain in 1941 during the Second World War; a separate National Fire Service was created in 1942. The NFS was created in August 1941 by the amalgamation of the wartime nation ...

National Loaf

The National Loaf was a bread made from wholemeal flour with added calcium and vitamins, introduced in Britain during the Second World War by the Federation of Bakers. Introduced in 1942, the loaf was made from wholemeal flour to combat wartime s ...

National Savings Movement

The National Savings Movement was a British mass savings movement that operated between 1916 and 1978 and was used to finance the deficit of government spending over tax revenues. The movement was instrumental during World War II in raising funds ...

Paper Salvage 1939–50

Paper Salvage was a part of a programme launched by the British Government in 1939 at the outbreak of the Second World War to encourage the recycling of materials to aid the war effort, and which continued to be promoted until 1950.

Second Great Fire of London

The Second Great Fire of London in December 1940 was one of the most destructive air raids of the Blitz during World War II. The Luftwaffe raid caused fires over an area greater than that of the Great Fire of London in 1666, leading one American ...

Slades Hill army camp

Slades Hill army camp was a Second World War British Army camp and anti-aircraft battery in Slades Hill, Enfield, London, that formed part of Londons defences against attack by German bombers.

Operation Steinbock

Operation Steinbock, sometimes called the Baby Blitz, was a strategic bombing campaign by the German Air Force during the Second World War. It targeted southern England and lasted from January to May 1944. Steinbock was the last strategic air off ...

Therell Always Be an England

Therell Always Be an England is an English patriotic song, written and distributed in the summer of 1939, which became highly popular upon the outbreak of World War II. It was composed and written by Ross Parker and Hughie Charles, and a popular ...

Truth (British periodical)

Truth was a British periodical publication founded by the diplomat and Liberal politician Henry Labouchere. The first issue was published on 4 January 1877. Labouchere founded the periodical after he left a virtual rival publication, The World. T ...

United Kingdom home front during World War II

The United Kingdom home front during World War II covers the political, social and economic history during 1939–1945. See also Timeline of the United Kingdom home front during World War II, Military history of the United Kingdom during World War ...

Utility Radio

The Utility Radio or Wartime Civilian Receiver was a valve domestic radio receiver, manufactured in Great Britain during World War II starting in July 1944. It was designed by G.D. Reynolds of Murphy Radio. Both AC and battery-operated versions w ...

War Agricultural Executive Committee

The War Agricultural Executive Committees were government-backed organisations tasked with increasing agricultural production in each county of the United Kingdom, during both the First and Second World Wars. They were established in Autumn 1915 ...

Why Britain is at War

Why Britain is at War is a polemic treatise written by Harold Nicolson and first published by Penguin Books on 7 November 1939 shortly after the Second World War began. In the book, Nicolson explores Adolf Hitlers insatiable grasp for power, the ...

Womens Land Army (World War II)

"Womens Land Army", "Land Girl" and "Land Girls" redirect here. For other uses, see Womens Land Army disambiguation, The Land Girls film Land Girls TV series. The Womens Land Army was a British civilian organisation created during World War II so ...

American music during World War II

American music during World War II was considered to be popular music that was enjoyed during the late 1930s through the mid-1940s.

American propaganda during World War II

During active American involvement in World War II, propaganda was used to increase support for the war and commitment to an Allied victory. Using a vast array of media, propagandists instigated hatred for the enemy and support for Americas allie ...

Arlington Farms

Arlington Farms was a temporary housing complex for female civil servants and service members during World War II. Built in 1942–1943 by the United States Governments Federal Works Agency, Arlington Farms was located on the former site of the Uni ...

Babbitt, Nevada

Babbitt, Nevada, was a populated place established as a 1941 government housing facility for workers of the neighboring Hawthorne Naval Ammunition Depot. Subsequently, used as a Cold War radar station, remaining town structures include the school ...

Big Inch

The Big Inch and Little Big Inch, collectively known as the Inch pipelines, are petroleum pipelines extending from Texas to New Jersey, built between 1942 and 1944 as emergency war measures in the U.S. Before World War II, petroleum products were ...

California during World War II

California during World War II was a major contributor to the World War II effort. Californias long Pacific Ocean coastline provided the support needed for the Pacific War. California also supported the war in Europe. After the Japanese attack on ...

California Shipbuilding Corporation

California Shipbuilding Corporation built 467 Liberty and Victory ships during World War II, including Haskell -class attack transports. California Shipbuilding Corporation was often referred to as Calship. The Dictionary of American Naval Fighti ...

Camp Butner

Camp Butner was a United States Army installation in Butner, North Carolina during World War II. It was named after Army General Henry W. Butner. Part of it was used as a POW-Camp for German prisoners of war in the United States and this site eve ...

Camp Reynolds

Camp Reynolds, formerly known as Camp Shenango, was a World War II Military Personnel Replacement Depot located on what is now Transfer, Pennsylvania in Northwestern Pennsylvania. In 1994, the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission placed a ...

History of the Civil Air Patrol

Civil Air Patrol is the civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force. It was created by Administrative Order 9 in December 1941, with Maj. Gen. John F. Curry as the first CAP national commander. The organization was originally formed to prov ...

Cramer v. United States

Not to be confused with Cramer v. United States 1923, an opinion involving individual aboriginal title in California. Cramer v. United States, 325 U.S. 1, was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States reviewed the conviction of Antho ...

Defoe Shipbuilding Company

The Defoe Shipbuilding Company was a small ship builder established in 1905 in Bay City, Michigan, United States. It ceased to operate in 1976 after failing to renew its contracts with the United States Navy. The site of the former company is now ...

Deportation of Germans from Latin America during World War II

During World War II, 4.058 ethnic Germans along with other Axis-nationals living in Latin America were deported to the United States at the behest of the US government. While deportation was conducted ostensibly to curb Nazi subterfuge, like the ...

Dodge Chicago Plant

The Dodge Chicago Aircraft Engine Plant was a World War II defense plant that built the majority of the B-29 bomber aircraft engines used in World War II. The plant design was initiated by automotive plant designer Albert Kahn and his company. Th ...

SS Dorothy Phillips

SS Dorothy Phillips was a 2.119-ton cargo ship that was attacked during World War II. The Japanese submarine I-23 fired at her on December 24, 1941. Dorothy Phillips was damaged in the attack off the coast of Monterey, California. In the attack t ...