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Minimalist program

In linguistics, the minimalist program is a major line of inquiry that has been developing inside generative grammar since the early 1990s, starting with a 1993 paper by Noam Chomsky. Chomsky presents MP as a program, not as a theory, following I ...

Mirror theory

In theoretical linguistics, mirror theory refers to a particular approach to the architecture of the language organ developed by Michael Brody, who claims his theory to be purely representational.

Mitigated speech

Mitigated speech is a linguistic term describing deferential or indirect speech inherent in communication between individuals of perceived High Power Distance which has been in use for at least two decades with many published references. The term ...

Mock language

Mock language is a term in linguistic anthropology for the intentional use of a language not spoken by or native to the speaker that is used to reinforce the speakers language ideology of the hegemonic language. When talking, the speaker includes ...

MOGUL framework

The MOGUL framework is a research framework aiming to provide a theoretical perspective on the nature of language. MOGUL draws on the common ground underlying various related areas of cognitive science including psycholinguistics, theoretical lin ...

Morphome (linguistics)

The term morphome refers to a function in linguistics which is purely morphological or has an irreducibly morphological component. The term is particularly used by Martin Maiden following Mark Aronoffs identification of morphomic functions and th ...

Neolinguistics

Neolinguistics is the school of linguistics founded by Matteo Bartoli as a reaction to the Neogrammarians. Along with the Neoidealists it was one of the main rivals of the Neogrammarians, until structuralism, which emerged from the Neogrammarian ...

Nominal identity

Nominal identity is the identity in name only as opposed to the individual experience of that identity. The concept is often used in sociology, psychology and linguistics.

Non-lexical vocables in music

Non-lexical vocables, which may be mixed with meaningful text, are a form of nonsense syllable used in a wide variety of music. Common English examples would be "la la", "na na" or "da da".

Noun particle

A noun particle is any morpheme that denotes or marks the presence of a noun. Noun particles do not exist in English, but can be found in other languages such as Korean and Japanese.

Object language

An object language is a language which is the "object" of study in various fields including logic, linguistics, mathematics, and theoretical computer science. The language being used to talk about an object language is called a metalanguage. An o ...

Optimot

Optimot, linguistic inquiries, is a service provided by the Directorate - General of Linguistic Policy of the Catalan Government in collaboration with the Institute for Catalan Studies and the Terminology Center TERMCAT. It consists of a search e ...

Pleonasm

Pleonasm is the use of more words or parts of words than are necessary or sufficient for clear expression: for example black darkness or burning fire. Such redundancy is, by traditional rhetorical criteria, a manifestation of tautology, and might ...

Pseudoword

A pseudoword or non-word is a unit of speech or text that appears to be an actual word in a certain language, while in fact it has no meaning in the lexicon. It is a kind of non-lexical vocable. Such word is composed of a combination of phonemes ...

Referential indeterminacy

In linguistics, referential indeterminacy is a situation in which different people vary in naming objects. For example, William Labov studied this effect using illustrations of different drinking vessels to see what people would label as "cups" a ...

Reflexiveness

Reflexiveness is one of Charles Hocketts 16 Design features of language which states that in a language the speaker can use his/her language to talk about language. Speakers of a language are able to have knowledge about their language and be abl ...

Register complex

In linguistics, a register complex is a combination of phonation type, pitch, length, vowel quality and/or other variants that function dependently as distinguishing features within a single phonological system. In languages employing register sy ...

Rhema

Rhema literally means an "utterance" or "thing said" in Greek. It is a word that signifies the action of utterance. In philosophy, it was used by both Plato and Aristotle to refer to propositions or sentences. In Christianity, it is used in refer ...

Speaker types

Within the linguistic study of endangered languages, sociolinguists distinguish between different speaker types based on the type of competence they have acquired of the endangered language. Often when a community is gradually shifting away from ...

Squib (writing)

A squib is a brief satirical or witty piece of writing or speech, like a lampoon, or a short, sometimes humorous piece in a newspaper or magazine, used as a filler. It can be intended to ignite thinking and discourse by others on topics of theore ...

Structural linguistics

Structural linguistics is an approach to linguistics originating from the work of Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure and is part of the overall approach of structuralism. Saussures Course in General Linguistics, published posthumously in 1916, ...

Synchrony and diachrony

Synchrony and diachrony are two different and complementary viewpoints in linguistic analysis. A synchronic approach considers a language at a moment in time without taking its history into account. Synchronic linguistics aims at describing a lan ...

Syntagmatic analysis

In semiotics, syntagmatic analysis is analysis of syntax or surface structure as opposed to paradigms. This is often achieved using commutation tests. "Syntagmatic" means that one element selects the other element either to precede it or to follo ...

Tautology (language)

In literary criticism and rhetoric, a tautology is a statement which repeats an idea, using near-synonymous morphemes, words or phrases, "saying the same thing twice". Tautology and pleonasm are not consistently differentiated in literature. Like ...

Text, Speech and Dialogue

Text, Speech and Dialogue is an annual conference involving topics on natural language processing and computational linguistics. The meeting is held every September alternating in Brno and Pilsen, Czech Republic. The first Text, Speech and Dialog ...

Thematic structure

Thematic structure is a concept in linguistics. When people talk, there are purposes in three separable parts of utterances, the act of speech, the propositional content and the thematic structure. Because speaking is cooperative, in order that t ...

Theoretical linguistics

Theoretical linguistics is the branch of linguistics which inquires into the nature of language itself and seeks to answer fundamental questions as to what language is and why languages have the properties they have. Linguistic metalanguage, theo ...

Theta criterion

The theta-criterion is a constraint on x-bar theory that was first proposed by Noam Chomsky as a rule within the system of principles of the government and binding theory, called theta-theory. As theta-theory is concerned with the distribution an ...

Topic and comment

In linguistics, the topic, or theme, of a sentence is what is being talked about, and the comment is what is being said about the topic. This division into old vs. new content is called information structure. It is generally agreed that clauses a ...

Traditional transmission

Traditional transmission is a design feature of language that the anthropologist Charles F. Hockett developed to distinguish the features of human language from those of animal communication. He discovered thirteen features that all human languag ...

Transformational syntax

In linguistics, transformational syntax is a derivational approach to syntax that developed from the extended standard theory of generative grammar originally proposed by Noam Chomsky in his books Syntactic Structures and Aspects of the Theory of ...

Turn construction unit

A turn construction unit is the fundamental segment of speech in a conversation, as analyzed in conversation analysis. The idea was introduced in and is meant to describe pieces of conversation which may comprise an entire turn. The end of a TCU, ...

Ultrasound tongue imaging

Ultrasound tongue imaging has been used for speech production and linguistics research since it came into regular clinical use in the 1960s and 1970s. It is a non-invasive technique allowing researchers to view the shape, position and movements o ...

Universal grammar

Universal grammar, in modern linguistics, is the theory of the genetic component of the language faculty, usually credited to Noam Chomsky. The basic postulate of UG is that a certain set of structural rules are innate to humans, independent of s ...

Value (semiotics)

Value is the sign as it is determined by the other signs in a semiotic system. For linguist Ferdinand de Saussure, for example, the content of a sign in linguistics is ultimately determined and delimited not by its internal content, but by what s ...

Variation (linguistics)

Variation is a characteristic of language: there is more than one way of saying the same thing. Speakers may vary pronunciation, word choice, or morphology and syntax. But while the diversity of variation is great, there seem to be boundaries on ...

Verse (poetry)

In the countable sense, a verse is formally a single metrical line in a poetic composition. However, verse has come to represent any division or grouping of words in a poetic composition, with groupings traditionally having been referred to as st ...

William Riley Parker Prize

The William Riley Parker Prize is the oldest award given by the Modern Language Association, the principal professional organization in the United States and Canada for scholars of language and literature. The Parker Prize is awarded each year fo ...

World Englishes

World Englishes is a term for emerging localized or indigenized varieties of English, especially varieties that have developed in territories influenced by the United Kingdom or the United States. The study of World Englishes consists of identify ...

Aberrant decoding

Aberrant decoding or aberrant reading is a concept used in fields such as communication and media studies, semiotics, and journalism about how messages can be interpreted differently from what was intended by their sender. The concept was propose ...

Academy of Theatre, Radio, Film and Television (Ljubljana)

The Academy of Theatre, Radio, Film and Television is an academy of the University of Ljubljana in Ljubljana, Slovenia. It is the only college and graduate school in Slovenia with a similar curriculum. It is composed of three colleges: the Colleg ...

Anti-fan

An anti-fan is someone who enjoys writing, discussing or in some cases making derivative works about a piece of media, but solely for the purpose of railing against or parodying it. It can also be a person with hatred towards a celebrity or icon.

Audience

An audience is a group of people who participate in a show or encounter a work of art, literature, theatre, music, video games, or academics in any medium. Audience members participate in different ways in different kinds of art; some events invi ...

Australian Teachers of Media

The Australian Teachers Of Media or ATOM is an independent, not-for-profit, professional association that promotes the study of media and screen literacy. The membership of ATOM includes a collective of educators from across all subject disciplin ...

Berkeley Media Studies Group

Berkeley Media Studies Group conducts research on the influence of mass media over public health and social issues. The BMSG works with community groups, journalists, and public health professionals to use "the power of the media" to advance heal ...

Best Enemies

Best Enemies is an education resource and film created by Ross and Darren Bark that discusses the cyber bullying problem in Australian schools, and explores how to tackle it and help students become pro-active in reporting and stopping it.

Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies

The Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies was a research centre at the University of Birmingham, England. It was founded in 1964 by Richard Hoggart, its first director. From 1964 to 2002, the Centre played a "critical" role in developing the f ...

CADRE Laboratory for New Media

The CADRE Laboratory for New Media was founded in 1985 at San Jose State University. It is currently coordinated by percussionist and media artist Andrew Blanton. It was previously coordinated by G. Craig Hobbs as well as Joel Slayton, professor ...

Center for Media and Public Affairs

The Center for Media and Public Affairs is a self-described nonpartisan and nonprofit research and educational organization that is affiliated with George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. It was founded in 1985 by political scientists S. Ro ...

Center for research on Children, Adolescents, and the Media

The Center for research on Children, Adolescents and the Media at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, was founded in 2005 by Patti Valkenburg. Since then, it has grown into one of the largest research centers in its kind worldwide. CCAM ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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