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Magan

Magan civilization, also written Makan or Makkan, an ancient region referred to in Sumerian texts Magan, Russia, a rural locality a selo in the Sakha Republic, Russia Aman Magan, a village in Iran Magan Airport, an airport in the Sakha Republic, ...

Stele of Ushumgal

The Stele of Ushumgal is an early Sumerian stone tablet, dating to the Early Dynastic I-II, and probably originating from Umma. It is currently located in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The stele is 22 cm high. It is partially decipher ...

Kindazi

Kindazi was a minor Sumerian god. He was a "divine barber" and an acolyte of god Ningirsu. He is known from inscriptions, such as a macehead dedicated by queen Ninkagina for the life of King Nam-mahani of Lagash: / / / / / / / / / / / / / d kinda ...

Kalyani Natarajan

Kalyani Natarajan is an Indian actress who has appeared in Tamil, Telugu and Hindi-language films. She played prominent roles in Saivam and Pisaasu.

John Rowlands

John Rowlands may refer to: John Rowlands RAF officer 1915–2006, George Cross recipient, World War II bomb disposal expert, post-war developer of British A-bomb John Rowlands, programmer of Mayhem in Monsterland and other video games birth name o ...

David Richards

Dave Richards born 1943, English chairman of the FA Premier League David Richards footballer 1896–1971, English soccer player Davey Richards born 1983, American wrestler David Richards American football born 1966, NFL offensive lineman David Rich ...

John Selwyn Lloyd

John Selwyn Lloyd is a Welsh-language author of novels for children and young adults. He was born in Talysarn in the Nantlle Valley, a heavily Welsh-speaking area of North Wales. He lives in Corwen.

If I Were You

If I Were You Hubbard novel, a 1940 novel by L. Ron Hubbard If I Were You Si jetais vous., a 1947 novel by Julien Green If I Were You Wodehouse novel, a 1931 novel by P.G. Wodehouse

Vonnegut (crater)

Vonnegut is a crater on Mercury, near the north pole. It was named by the IAU in 2017 after the American author Kurt Vonnegut. Part of Vonneguts 1959 novel The Sirens of Titan takes place on Mercury. S band radar data from the Arecibo Observatory ...

Swimming Lessons: Poems

Swimming Lessons: Poems is an upcoming 2020 young adult coming of age poetry book written by American actress Lili Reinhart and published by St. Martins Griffin.

Local history book

A local history book is a Norwegian publication genre describing the history and population of one or more rural settlements. Norwegian local history books have usually been published under the auspices of or in collaboration with the municipalit ...

William Melmoth the younger

He was the son of William Melmoth the elder and his second wife, Catherine Rolt, was probably born in London, and was baptised in 1710. He was schooled in Westminster, and entered Lincolns Inn in 1724. He matriculated at Magdalene College, Cambri ...

Old sergeants syndrome

The term old sergeant’s syndrome is used to describe symptoms of psychological disturbance exhibited by officers in military units that suffer heavy casualties. It is most common in cohesive military squads that have strong interpersonal relation ...

Polyurethane dispersion

Polyurethane Dispersion, or PUD, is understood to be a polyurethane polymer resin dispersed in water, rather than a solvent. Its manufacture involves the synthesis of polyurethanes having carboxylic acid functionality or nonionic hydrophiles like ...

The Manor

The Manor may refer to: in Australia The Manor, Mosman, a large 1911 house in the Sydney suburb of Mosman in England Manor Ground Oxford, former home ground of Oxford United F.C., known colloquially as The Manor The Manor Studio, a recording stud ...

Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome

Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome is a rare autosomally inherited condition characterised by developmental delay, intellectual disability and decreased visual acuity.

Time Machine

The Time Machine 1960 film, a film by George Pal The Time Machine 1978 film, a made-for-television version Time Machine: The Journey Back, a 1993 documentary film Time Machine unfinished film, an unfinished Bollywood science-fiction film The Time ...

Light soaking

Light soaking refers to the change in power output of solar cells which can be measured after illumination. This can either be an increase or decrease, depending on the type of solar cell. The cause of this effect and the consequences on efficien ...

Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period

Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period is a non-fiction book written by Tilar J. Mazzeo. In the book, Mazzeo shows that Romantic Period ideas surrounding plagiarism are at variance with twentieth century perceptions. Also, Mazzeo ...

Small integral membrane protein 14

Small integral membrane protein 14, also known as SMIM14 or C4orf34, is a protein encoded on chromosome 4 of the human genome by the SMIM14 gene. SMIM14 has at least 298 orthologs mainly found in jawed vertebrates and no paralogs. SMIM14 is class ...

Sabhasad Bakhar

Shri-Shiva-Prabhuche-Charitra, better known as Sabhasad Bakhar, is a Marathi language biography of Shivaji, the founder of the Maratha Empire. It was written by Krishnaji Anant Sabhasad at Jinji, at the court of Shivajis son Rajaram in 1697. The ...

Tirel

Tirel is a French surname which may have either been a nickname for a stubborn person or alternatively be a surname of baptismal origin from the personal name Thorvald. It is the source of the frequent English surnames Tyrrell, Tyrell, Terrell an ...

Cytokine storm

A cytokine storm is a human bodily reaction in which the innate immune system releases a large number of cytokines, potentially overwhelming the body and possibly leading to fatality.

Wife (disambiguation)

Wife novel, a 1975 novel by Bharati Mukherjee "The Wife", 1819 essay by Washington Irving from The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. A Wife, 1614 poem by Sir Thomas Overbury The Wife, 2003 novel by Meg Wolitzer The Wife of Baths Tale, a tale ...

Gauks saga Trandilssonar

The Saga of Gaukur a Stong is believed to have existed but is now considered lost. The saga – set in the anthology of sagas known as Modruvallabok between Njals saga and Egils saga Skalla-Grimssonar – tells of a man named Gaukur Trandilsson who l ...

Dusan Jezdic

Dusan Jezdic or Dushan Yezdich was a Serbian Chetnik voivode who participated in the struggle for Old Serbia and Macedonia, the Balkan Wars and the First World War.

John A Ambrose

John A Ambrose is an internationally renowned expert in coronary artery disease. He is one of the pioneers in acute coronary syndromes having published over 40 articles in the cardiology literature between 1985 and 2000 on their pathogenesis. He ...

Ecce Homo (disambiguation)

Ecce Homo Bosch, 1470s, a painting of the episode in the Passion of Jesus by Hieronymus Bosch Ecce Homo Juan Luna 1896, an 1896 painting by Juan Luna Ecce homo Martinez and Gimenez, Borja c. 1930, a fresco by Elias Garcia Martinez, damaged in a f ...

Stadtbibliothek Schaffhausen

The Stadtbibliothek Schaffhausen maintains a universal scientific stock., but without being associated with a university. Since the Canton of Schaffhausen does not maintain its own library, the Public Library performs the tasks of a cantonal libr ...

Peter Pan disk

A Peter Pan disk is a circumstellar disk around a star or brown dwarf with a spectral type of M or later. To fit the definition of a Peter Pan disk the source needs K s − W 4 > 2 {\displaystyle Ks-W4> 2}, an age of > 20 Myr and spectrosc ...

2.2-Dimethylpentane

2.2-Dimethylpentane is one of the isomers of heptane. It is also called neoheptane as it contains the 3 C grouping. It has the most extreme properties of the isomers.

Isolated levocardia

Isolated levocardia is a rare type of organs situs inversus in which the heart is still in normal position but other abdominal viscera are transposed. Isolated levocardia may occur with heart defects and patients without having operations have lo ...

Narayanacharya

Narayanacharya, was an Indian scholar and philosopher of Dvaita Vedānta tradition. He was the disciple of Vedavyasa Tirtha of Uttaradi Math and is the most celebrated name in the annals of the great dvaita-advaita debate. Narayanacharya is notabl ...

Vespers (disambiguation)

Sicilian Vespers, an event that started the War of the Sicilian Vespers Asiatic Vespers, a massacre of Roman citizens during the Mithridatic Wars War of the Sicilian Vespers, a rebellion in Sicily in 1282 against King Charles I

Craig Leith (hill)

In historical literature, Craig Leith has been referred to as West Hill as far back as 1796 in the Statistical Accounts of Scotland: Alva, County of Stirling, OSA, Vol. XVIII. The accounts written in 1796 mention that "On the brow of this is a ve ...

Journey to the West (disambiguation)

Journey to the West 1986 TV series, two-season Chinese television series produced by CCTV, released in the 1980s and 1998 Monkey TV series or Journey to the West, a 70s Japanese television drama based on the Chinese novel Journey to the West, by ...

Orphee (disambiguation)

Orphee Louis Lully, a 1690 opera La descente dOrphee aux enfers H 488, a 1680s opera by Marc-Antoine Charpentier Orphee aux enfers, Orpheus in the Underworld, a Jacques Offenbach operetta Orphee et Eurydice, the French adaptation of Glucks opera ...

Father Paul du Ru

Father Paul Du Ru: is a jesuit priest who was active during the 1700s in the greater Mississippi area. Du Ru was born in Vernon, France in the reigion of Normandy. He entered the novitiate when he was twenty, after he completed his courses he was ...

List of BDSM literature

The following is a chronological list of notable literature about or involving BDSM, both fictional and non-fictional. Both written literature and comics are included, but not films or video. Series are listed as one item; where publication date ...

Ottilie von Goethe

Ottilie Wilhelmine Ernestine Henriette von Goethe was a German socialite and the daughter-in-law of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Her father, Wilhelm Julius Baron von Pogwisch 1760–1836, was of Holstein nobility, her mother, Henriette Ulrike Ottili ...

King Arthur (disambiguation)

King Arthur DC Comics, a version of Arthur in DC Comics Le Morte dArthur, 15th-century work of Sir Thomas Malory King Arthur: An Heroick Poem in Twelve Books, a 1697 poem by Richard Blackmore King Arthur The Seven Deadly Sins 2014 TV series, a ve ...

Hells Half Acre

"Hells Half Acre", or "Devils half acre", an area of slave trading and jails in the 1800s, including Lumpkins jail, Richmond, Virginia Omaha, Nebraskas redlight district in the late 1800s "Hells Half-Acre", a notorious section of Nashville, Tenne ...

James Grieve

James Grieve may refer to: James Grieve footballer, English football forward active in the 1930s James Grieve apple, an old variety of apple James Michael Trevlyn Grieve 1932–1995, Scottish journalist and political activist James Grieve director ...

Sleepy Hollow

Sleepy Hollow, Saskatchewan, Canada Sleepy Hollow, South Australia, coastal feature adjoining the mouth of the Murray River Sleepy Hollow Mars, shallow depression on the planet Mars

Peter White

Peter White actor born 1937, American actor Peter White St. Elsewhere, a character on the 1980s hospital drama St. Elsewhere Peter White broadcaster born 1947, British broadcast journalist and radio presenter Pete White The Venture Bros., a chara ...

Andrew Rutherford

Andrew Rutherford may refer to: Andrew Rutherford English scholar 1929–1998, Regius Professor of English Literature at the University of Aberdeen and Warden of Goldsmiths College, University of London Andrew Rutherford lutenist born 195?, America ...

Richard Armstrong

Richard Armstrong may refer to: Richard Armstrong politician 1815–1880, UK MP for the Irish borough constituency of Sligo, 1865–1868 Sir Richard Armstrong British Army officer 1782–1854, British army officer Richard Armstrong museum director born ...

Lucie Armstrong

Lucie Armstong, also known as Lucie Heaton Armstrong, was an English-Irish journalist and writer on etiquette. Armstrong had her first work - The Ball-Room Guide - published anonymously in 1880; this was followed by stories for children published ...

Toil

Toil may refer to: Manual labour Time off in lieu In literature: "Toil" Shlonsky poem Hebrew: "Amal", a 1928 Hebrew-language Zionist settler poem by Avraham Shlonsky "Toil" English: "Will", a Gaelic poem by Sean O Riordain Toil, an 1890 English t ...

Charles Rogers (author)

Charles Rogers was a Scottish minister, and a versatile, prolific author. In the second half of his life he repeatedly ran into trouble for setting up publication societies from which he gained financial benefit.